Types of online dating scams

29-Mar-2020 00:42 by 2 Comments

Types of online dating scams

One of the lesser-known breeds of scammers, survey scammers take a seemingly harmless approach to their scams that make them appear to be friendly and curious at first, but later lead users to giving up personal information.

The bigger danger comes from human interaction, where, as in those familiar scam email exchanges, the person behind the profile doesn’t want your heart; they just want your money. While the UK’s favored scammer line sounds ridiculous, the top spot in the US goes to “i am very easy going and laid back.” Okay, so it’s no Pablo Neruda.

Instead, they begin their conversations with a simple question or two about the user’s experience on that particular dating site.

Once they’ve convinced their match that they are simply a fellow dater who is curious about other’s experiences with the service or are an employee of that service, they are able to establish a level of trust that leads to victims unknowing giving out personal information, like their phone number, home address or payment information, to someone who is only looking to rip them off or pay them more unwanted attention online and offline.

The most popular con-man profile text in the UK, for example is “so please i want you to get back to me here with your email address so that i can send you my pictures so get back to me thanks.” Hard to imagine swiping right on that.

Quantity of text isn’t a great indicator, says Winchester, in part because of the growing popularity of bots.

An exotic stranger needs help, and you’re the only one able to provide it.

On any given day, a handful of those pleas still file into your email’s spam folder.

Suddenly I had to stop doing new features and trying to acquire new users,” in order to keep up with squashing scammers.

There was no dedicated screening service at that time, Winchester says. Well, he did along with an acquaintance, Nick Tsinonis, who already had expertise using machine learning to help match dating site users based not on their expressed preference, but on behavior.

The result, Scamalytics, is a company that’s able not only to identify a number of key profile traits—in the “low hundreds,” says Winchester—but to measure how they play against one another for a more complete picture of who’s real and who’s swindling.“Features that in isolation may not give you too much information, in combination become much more powerful,” says Winchester.

“We then take the learnings from that academic exercise, and try to scale them up into a production environment that works at enormous speed.”Some of those indicators are proprietary, but a few are fairly obvious.

“And their targets genuinely fall in love with those individuals, even after the scam has been executed…